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Bringing Home Fruits

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Corzhens, Sep 28, 2016.

  1. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    When you are touring abroad, don't attempt to bring home fruits. If possible, just eat all the fruits that you can eat while there. We have so many sad experiences in bringing home fruits and the latest was last year in Beijing. The strawberries were large and so sweet that we were tempted to buy 3 kilos for bringing home. But the airline did not permit us to carry it to the plane so we were forced to put it in the check in baggage. When we arrived, the very fresh strawberries were bruised and not fit to eat anymore. That's the same with the sugar apple we brought home from Thailand, not palatable anymore when placed in the plane's cargo area.
     
  2. Yes, that's very true. Fresh fruits will never survive the long journey home. Just take lots of pictures to show your friends back home. Then eat what you want and enjoy relating the memory when you get home. I think there are only a couple of ways to bring home something of the exotic fruits we find in our travels. Try to get a canned version. True, it's not anything like the fresh ones but it's better than nothing. Another way is to get the dried version. In Thailand, we can get the dried version of many fruits. Mango is available as dried strips. Durian is available as a cooked cake. Even longan is available in dried form. Here's a picture of dried longan:
    3T343om.
     
  3. If you really find a fruit you like, try to find out exact species it and see if you can find seeds or plants. Then just mail those back to yourself. The seeds would definitely survive shipping, plus you don't have to worry about bringing an invasive species of bugs or germs with you from the fruits and vegetables. I did this with a pineapple recently, it was really sweet, so I saved the top, wrapped it in wet paper towels and cheese cloth and sent it to myself. By the time I arrived home, it was already grown roots. Other than that, yeah, pig out on as much food as you can.
     
    Corzhens likes this.
  4. That's sounds like a great idea. Just curious. How did your pineapple top get through the customs? In my country, anything going through the postal service would be subject to scrutiny. Very often, packages are opened to check what's inside. Did you use a courier service?
     
  5. The farm I went to was really locally famous for it's fruits because they have such a distinct taste. It seems that there were a lot of visitors before me that wanted to send back seeds and tops that you can find people waiting on the road offering to help send it back. I paid a fee to have someone get a permit to send the tops and seeds to my home. It went through customs but it had papers and permission, so it handled customs just fine though I was missing a couple seeds because they are considered invasive. It's annoying and there is always a risk that you won't get them through but you can buy permits online if you really want them.
     
  6. That's sounds like a plan. Actually, there's a fruit which I would like to get from South America. It's called guarana. The idea is to propagate it locally. The climate here is very close to that of South America. The rubber plantations we have here started with seeds from South America. Is there anyone here who is in South America? Is there any chance of getting a guarana seed?
     
  7. reverserewind

    reverserewind Member

    I had no trouble. In fact, I was even eating an apple when customs workers were checking our baggage. So, I'm guessing they shouldn't take anything away from you. However, you'd better always read the rules in advance.
     
  8. reverserewind

    reverserewind Member

    As far as I know, seashells are not allowed to be transported out of Australia. I have no idea why.
     
  9. Ava

    Ava Member

    Many countries do not allow fruits or foods to enter the country and they will be confiscated. It makes sense because who knows what is in them, but while you may want to take an apple on board a flight, it's probably best not to and to eat if at the airport as it could get taken away. Dried foods are fine, but fresh fruits may have insects in them or other diseases that could spread.
     
  10. Yes, there are restrictions on fresh fruits crossing borders. It's the question of unwanted insects that may be hidden in the fruits. Same goes for plants. Anything which has earth with it is suspect. There are all kinds of organisms which can be in the earth. I found this out then I wanted to take some flowering plants from Thailand to Malaysia. The only way I could do that is to wash off all the earth first.
     
  11. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    Yeah, that's the advice to us of the tour guide in Bangkok - to eat fruits that we like as much as we can. She said that fruits get spoiled when placed in the cargo area. And when you place it in the hand-carry, it is not allowed in the plane. I remember one time that we brought home some giant sugar apple from Bangkok. When we reached home, the fruits were bruised. And since they are not yet ripe, the result was disastrous for the ripening was not completed and almost half of the fruit was wasted.
     
  12. Ava

    Ava Member

    Fresh food also goes off and attracts vermin so that's another reason. In some tropical climates bugs live on fresh fruit, and how many spiders and other insects have been found in boxes of bananas from other countries when they are imported. I think even when they are officially imported the checks are not that strict as it can be hard to detect insects hiding.
     
  13. I think this idea of bringing home fresh fruits is motivated by our desire to share with our friends back home. There is a limit to what you can share. Like I mentioned earlier, the best way to share an exotic fruit would be to get a dried version to take home. The dried version should be easy to carry and will definitely keep until you get home. It may not taste exactly like the fresh version but it's still something to share with your friends at home.
     
  14. amelia88

    amelia88 Active Member

    Definitely in Australia they're strict about bringing in fruits/vegetables, I know that one trip I took down under they scanned my suitcase and thought that a round container of hair product that I have was an apple, and they made me take everything out of my case to show them that it was actually hair product like I said to them!

    They are super cautious there.