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Don't Forget To Bring...?

Discussion in 'Asia' started by DreamingOfCherryBlossoms, Sep 27, 2016.

  1. When traveling to a foreign country there are certain things that you will need. For my trip to South Korea, I was told to bring tampons because you can't buy them there. I know the usually passports, id, and that but what thing do you have to bring when you travel?
     
  2. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    It's not that they don't have tampons, it's just that they're super overpriced because no one really uses them there.

    For me, when I moved to Japan, I had to bring my deodorant(s). Before you start raising eyebrows, let me explain. Deodorants in Japan might be cheap and have a lot of different scents, but they don't work. At all. If you sweat even just a little bit, the deodorant will wear off. The reason Japanese deodorants don't work is because they don't have aluminum zirconium (or they don't use enough of it). So for me, when I moved to Japan, I brought with me 5-6 sticks of deodorants. Since then I've gone to Hong Kong and gotten a couple more sticks.
     
  3. amelia88

    amelia88 Active Member

    The one thing I always push myself not to forget is an adaptor. Most countries have different outlets, and if you bring things like electronics, you're going to be wanting to charge them - and it is all for naught if you forget a charger!

    Some hotels do have universal adaptors if you check with the front desk - but I prefer bringing my own just to be sure!
     
  4. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    We have a toiletry kit that comes complete with what we need including soap, shampoo, deodorant and lotion because not all hotels have those freebies. With the phone's charger, I bring along a universal charger that can fit any kind of socket. On our first trip to Singapore, we had to borrow an adaptor for the socket is 3-pronged and we have the ordinary plug with 2 prongs only. When we left, we brought home that adaptor as a souvenir. Practically, everything is covered when it comes to personal needs although sometimes we have to buy slippers (when we forget to bring) particularly when we have booked in a cheap hotel.
     
  5. This wasn't a problem not too long ago. I could just travel and make do along the way. However, ever since I was put on medication, that's something I cannot leave behind. I must have my daily dose of Amlopidine and Metformin. There's no way of knowing whether I can get them where I am going, so I have to make sure that I have my medication with me whenever I travel now.
     
    amelia88 likes this.
  6. reverserewind

    reverserewind Member

    I usually take the whole medication pack with me as I know that I'm gonna have trouble finding and buying my medication in a foreign country. So, that's a must have.
     
  7. Ava

    Ava Member

    There are several things I always take and that is chargers and adapters for all my tech gear. Another thing is to take medication that I am familiar with because sometimes you can't find what you need, or a product you feel you can trust. As I can't swallow tablets, I have to have powdered medication or tablets that can be dissolved or chewed, so for me it's very important.
     
  8. Looks like quite a number of people need to have their medication with them all the time. Say, what kind of medication are you people on? I am on Amlopidine for my hypertension and Metformin for my diabetes. How about you?
     
  9. amelia88

    amelia88 Active Member

    I have a friend who is an insulin dependent diabetic and that's something she always has to consider when she travels, too. In some countries I don't think it would be a problem for her if she ran out, but in other places it would be super dangerous for her health if she had forgotten.
     
  10. Ava

    Ava Member

    I don't need any medication, but I think it's always better to be safe and tale more as another traveler may need it. I only ever used to take a small basic kit, then I traveled to a remote part of Bali where there was nothing, and it was great and relaxing until I got a motorcycle burn. There were no pharmacies or shops, and i had no bandages and a basic antiseptic cream. The policeman took me to the local village doctor who kindly gave me a supply of dressings and tape as he took care of the wound. I felt very silly for not having any basics like that and assumed I would be able to buy it locally. That's my lesson learned, never assume!
     
  11. Yes, that's something which would be a good addition to the list of must-haves. Myself, I don't really carry a first-aid kit. What I do carry is a pair of small scissors and a small mirror. There are so many things which can be done with a pair of small scissors and a small mirror.
     
  12. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    I'm having a hard time clicking the reply on the comment of @Ava. But anyway, medication is imperative for me since I have a maintenance medication for hypertension. But I also bring some other tablets to which my husband would joke that I am bringing a medicine cabinet. One common tablet is for diarrhea which you cannot predict nor prevent. Next is for the headache. But I don't bring medicine for muscle pain, we don't usually take that. Just to be on the safe side, sometimes a pharmacy abroad would require a prescription for a simple tablet for headache.
     
  13. I think the generic medication for a headache would be paracetamol. In some places, you might find aspirin as an alternative. These are all mild painkillers. I don't like to take them. When I have a headache, I look for the cause. Very often, it's just plain overwork. A good night's sleep is my best way of dealing with a headache.
     
  14. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    When you are bringing in medicine to an Asian country, make sure to check their policies and stuff. Some countries will not accept foreign medicine in their country and you have to declare it. If they catch you sneaking it in, they will fine you and take the medicine away.

    When I came to Japan, I was told that I'd have to declare any medication I was bringing along even if it was just pain killers. Even contact lenses had to be declared. The reason is there's an ingredient in American medicines that is illegal in Japan.
     
  15. Yes, I have noticed this when I was moving between Malaysia and Thailand. In Thailand, I am used to going to the pharmacy to get my antibiotics. When I was in Malaysia, I couldn't get the same antibiotics without a prescription from the doctor. There are also some differences with some well-known traditional medicine. There's one called Tiger Balm. It's a very old and established Chinese herbal ointment. In Malaysia, the manufacturer was required by law to change their original recipe. In Thailand, it was still manufactured using the old recipe. So when Malaysians go to Thailand, they would stock up on the Thai version of Tiger Balm. Here's a picture of the product:
    4g2Vyqd.
     
  16. expat007

    expat007 New Member

    Vitamins and medicines because these are essentials and cannot just be bought when you travel abroad. The medicines are for any emergency cases like migraine attacks or what have you. The vitamins are of course taken every day. I don't want to spoil the day looking for possible med or vitamins replacement. And it may not even be suitable for us to take. So better safe than sorry. Besides, they won't even consume too much space in our luggage.
     
  17. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    Can you bring the Thailand Tiger Balm back into Malaysia without declaring it? For Japan, they might let you bring in the medicine if you declare it and they approve it. But if you sneak it in and they catch you, they will confiscate your medicine.
     
  18. It all depends on the customs officers at the immigration checkpoint. There's one border crossing which I used regularly. If you go through about fifteen minutes before closing time, you are very likely to get waved through without being checked. The customs officers apparently are keen to go off duty on time.
     
  19. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    Oh, but what about generally speaking? Like if they find the Thailand Tiger Balm, will they confiscate it if it hasn't been declared?
     
  20. I have no idea about that because I have never seen anyone had their Thailand Tiger Balm confiscated. I am not sure if the customs officers are aware of the difference between the Malaysian and the Thailand brands. When I was living on the Malaysian-Thai border, I have seen how lax the customs officers can be. At one time, there was a scare with SARS. So anything that has to do with fowls or birds were prohibited from entry into Malaysia from Thailand. Well, it only lasted for a couple of weeks. The signboards are still there but the customs officers are no longer looking for the products. I think they only look for something if there is a specific directive to do it.
     
  21. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    I don't think any legal medication will pose a problem unless it has some extraordinary effect like a hallucinogen or something. I know that Tiger Balm, @Miya because I also use that sometimes for tummy ache. But what I bring is our counterpart of that Tiger Balm which is the Vicks Vaporub. I never go without it and never did it create an issue in my travels. I use that vaporub to apply on my tired feet because we usually take very long walks when we are abroad and my feet are usually hurting at night.
     
  22. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    It depends. The term "legal mediciation" is different in every country. Like I said, America uses an ingredient in their medicine that Japan calls "illegal" and that's why Americans must declare their medicine before entering Japan. If they are caught without declaring, it will be confiscated. That's why I'm wondering if other countries are just as strict with their policies.
     
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