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One Year Anywhere In Asia

Discussion in 'Asia' started by DreamingOfCherryBlossoms, Sep 24, 2016.

  1. If you were allowed to take one year off to live in any country for a year where would you live? Why? Where would you travel during your year there?
     
  2. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    If the choice is Asia, I would probably settle in either Singapore or Hongkong. The advantage of those 2 countries is the presence of so many Filipinos that I would not feel homesick at all. And since I have been going to Singapore and Hongkong every year, I am already used to the ins and outs particularly in roaming around. The train system in Hongkong is very convenient and the bus system in Singapore is also convenient although you have to wait for 30 minutes. With the food there, they are okay with me and I know I can be at home there.
     
  3. amelia88

    amelia88 Active Member

    For me I would say Japan, all the way. I love it there and it's probably my all time favorite travel spot. It's clean, organized, the people are polite, there's so much to see and do, and the food is amazing. I would love to see as much of the country as I could, and I think living there for 12 months would really give me the opportunity to explore a sizeable chunk of it. Plus, I feel like Japan has really beautiful contrasting seasons, so I would love getting to experience all of them across the course of 12 months!
     
  4. One whole year? I would go to Thailand. Yes, I have lived there for twenty years already but I had been working and I didn't have much time to travel anywhere. So if I have a whole year, I would like to explore Thailand fully. My ideal way to travel would be by motor tricycle. This is quite a popular form of transportation in Thailand. It's basically a motorcycle with a sidecar attached. I can load my luggage on the sidecar. I will probably pack to live outdoors. There are so many beaches in Thailand to spend the night. In one year, I should be able to go all over Thailand, from the Deep South where I used to live, up north to Chiangmai and the border with Myanmar, then to the North-East to Isaan and the border with Khmer. Here's a picture of what a motor tricycle looks like:
    4vfP3Dh.
     
  5. Valentino

    Valentino Member

    I'd most probably choose India. I've been in India before and as it's a huge country, one can't really visit all the tourist attractions in say a month or two. This is why I'd choose India if I had to live for an entire year in one Asian country. Perchance that would be long enough to visit all the must-see tourist attractions in India.
     
  6. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    I've already chosen and it's where I'm currently living -- Japan. It's my favorite place in the world. I feel safe and happy here.

    My second choice would be Hong Kong, which is my birthplace. It's also a great place and it's very similar to Japan.

    Singapore would also be interesting since I've never been there before. I heard it's a beautiful and clean country so I would love to visit it. In my case, my main reason for traveling to Singapore would be to try their cuisine XD
     
  7. amelia88

    amelia88 Active Member

    I went to Singapore earlier this year and the food is great - I love that because they have a bit of a fusion of Chinese, Indian and Malay foods all in Singapore that it's a really good place to try a bit of everything!
     
    Miya likes this.
  8. Say, for those who have been to Singapore recently, how are the natives there? I haven't been there for decades so I am really out of touch. However, from what I have heard, the Singaporeans are not very hospitable people. I was told that they tend to be a bit snobbish. Is that true?
     
  9. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    Yeah, I'm really interested in their cuisine. We have some restaurants here that serve Singapore food and I've always been curious to try. I figure that it'd be wiser to actually try it in Singapore though XD

    I've never heard this before... I'd also like more information on this if anyone has any input.
     
  10. amelia88

    amelia88 Active Member

    I didn't notice that, I found everyone pretty friendly! I think maybe it has a reputation as snobby because it's a lot higher in terms of cost of living than a lot of other countries in the region - I spent a lot more on accommodation and things like that than I have elsewhere in Asia - but the people were perfectly lovely! :)
     
  11. Good to know that Singaporeans are still friendly people. Maybe they reserve their snobbishness for only certain people, like, maybe, Chinese from Malaysia. Maybe I should go and visit my cousins in Singapore to find out more.
     
  12. Ava

    Ava Member

    I would prefer a beach hut on a Thai island. I've traveled around most of Asia and I like Thai food and the weather. I used to live in Hong Kong and I never liked it there, but Malaysia was okay, but I found it a little boring at times. I do have cousins that live in Singapore, and it was nice, but it wasn't exactly relaxing there either.

    In Thailand I like the fact you can go to a city, beach, or the countryside and the transport system is affordable.
     
  13. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    Given a choice between Thailand and Japan, I have to agree with @Aree Wongwanlee because I find Thailand to be a cheap place. And I love fruits which abound in the streets of Bangkok. With interesting places, I'm sure there are lots to go in Thailand including the beaches. In fairness to @Miya, I still haven't been to Japan although we have an impending trip there in March of 2017. Japan is an expensive place and it defeats the plus like the cleanliness and peace and order of the place. With the food, hmm, I don't go much for Japanese food but maybe I can get used to it.
     
  14. When you come to Thailand, don't just stay in Bangkok. Come and visit the provinces. If you like durians, come to Langsuan in the Chumphon province. It's about 600 kilometers south of Bangkok. That makes it about half-a-day's bus ride from Bangkok. Langsuan is in the middle of durian orchards. When the fruit is in season, you can get a big fruit for less than $3. When I was teaching there, I used to have one for lunch every day.
     
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  15. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    My husband loves durian very much. You can guess that he was eating durian in the streets of Bangkok (because it is not allowed inside the hotel). He would buy in the late afternoon when the prices are cheaper because they lower the price as the day wears on. We didn't have much time in Bangkok since we went to the open zoo and we also visited the temples. Maybe in our next trip to Thailand, we can visit the orchard. But what I love is the sugar apple, those giant fruits are a rarity here and so expensive. We were in Bangkok last March and the sugar apple was out of season. And speaking of fruits, we have 2 seedlings of maprang, that yellow fruit like a plum. We brought home some seeds and planted in pots.
     
  16. You really know how to make the most out of your trips @Corzhens. I am not familiar with the maprang. I did plant one of the lamyai trees in my home in Malaysia. It is already bearing fruit. Next time, try to get the lamyai. I think it's called longan in Chinese. This tree is supposed to grow up north where the weather is much cooler. However, they have produced a hybrid which grows well in the hotter south.

    Here's a picture of a lamyai aka longan:
    I3YiKMX.
     
  17. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    @Aree Wongwanlee, thanks for the tip about longan. Yeah, we call that longan and we have that here from the south of the country. As with other fruits in Bangkok, I never fail to indulge. Aside from the durian that my husband buys, we usually snack on macopa which is called Wax Apple in Thailand. You have the best wax apples there. Actually, all the fruits peddled in the streets of Bangkok are worth their price because they are of the best quality, so sweet watermelon and cantaloupe, even the young coconut is a treat.

    By the way, when we are in Singapore, there are 2 kinds of wax apple - 1 from Thailand and another from Malaysia which is cheaper. You can guess that the Thai wax apple is more expensive but much better in taste.
     
  18. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    I think most people think that Japan is a very expensive country. And it is, but only if you stay in the tourist areas. If you move around, you'll find that things there are fairly priced. I have lived in Japan for about 2 years now and I don't find myself spending any more money than I did back in America.
     
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  19. Good to know that Japan isn't any more expensive than America. Wait, America isn't exactly a cheap place to live in, is it? I think this whole question of whether a place is cheap or otherwise depends on what we are comparing it to. Thailand is cheap for me because I am comparing it to Malaysia. Malaysia is probably cheap for someone who comes from Japan, I suppose.
     
  20. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    I agree that it depends on what's being compared. But my point here is that when people say "Japan is expensive", they're usually referring to only the tourist areas and generally speaking, the tourist area in any country will be more expensive (compared to the non-tourist areas).
     
  21. You have got a good point there. Like in Songkhla, Thailand, where I was teaching. The area I lived in was right next to a well-known beach, the Samila Beach. Seafood is caught just off the coast. So seafood should be cheap, right? No, it isn't. That's because the area is also well-known to tourists. So, even though, I live right next to where the catch is brought in every day, I still pay a premium for my seafood because of the tourists. Compare that to Langsuan which is in the middle of durian orchards. The durians are sent out of the province. Not many tourists know about Langsuan. So the durians available locally are really cheap. And fresh, of course.
     
  22. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    Exactly my point. Tourist areas are always going to be more expensive because tourists will buy anything that's 'new' to them. So really, Japan (or any country) is only expensive if you stay in the tourist area. If you go anywhere else, you'll find that most things are priced fairly.
     
  23. Just curious. How much is a cup of coffee in a non-tourist area in Japan? In Malaysia, the price is a bit less than one US dollar. That's in non-tourist areas. In Thailand, you can get a cup of coffee for less than fifty US cents. That, again, is in a non-tourist area. How about in Japan?
     
  24. Miya

    Miya Active Member

    You can get a cup of coffee at convenience stores for 100 yen (98 cents USD). Before when the yen was lower, it only averaged to about 70 cents. Some convenience stores will have a deal where if you buy a breakfast item (bread, riceball, etc), you can add 60 yen (59 cents) to get a cup of coffee. I think those prices are fair.
     
  25. Thank you for the information. In that case, Japan is not really expensive at all. I am considering the fact that income in Japan is generally higher than that in Malaysia or Thailand. So one US dollar for a cup of coffee sounds like a good deal. In Malaysia, we do have places where you can get a cup of coffee for just $5. And in Thailand, there's one place I know of where I can get a cup of coffee for just 20 US cents.